Sharmi on the Trot

Travelling, Exploring, Eating…

Archive for the month “July, 2014”

In Photos: Good morning Taj!

Living in Delhi has many perks. The best one – tons of places to travel to in a moment’s notice. And the closest drive is to Agra – home of the Taj Mahal.

I remember a friend telling me years ago how her fiance stood at the gate, enthralled by the Taj’s beauty. How he vowed to go back but never found the time since. Well, I’ve travelled to Agra a few times but I have to admit, the best time to see the magnificent structure is at the crack of dawn. As the sky changes colours, the sun decides to peak from behind the clouds, the sylvette of the marble mausoleum beckons. I can’t describe in words you gorgeous the sight is.

It was a couple of weeks ago that two friends and I decided to drive down to Agra to see the sunrise. After a night of stuffing ourselves silly with chicken and pulao (a side of beer too!), we left Delhi for Agra down the new Yamuna Expressway. It’s pretty much a straight and fast drive. We made it just in time as the sun slowly rose spreading warmth and light.

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Tea, always welcome on the road!

Tea, always welcome on the road!

Entering the Taj from the West gate

Entering the Taj from the West gate

Isn't that a gorgeous sight!

Isn’t that a gorgeous sight!

Catching a glimpse of the peak!

Catching a glimpse of the peak!

Good morning Taj!

Good morning Taj!

Turning back!

Turning back!

A long way away!

A long way away!

Shining bright!

Shining bright!

Exploring the grounds

Exploring the grounds

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PS: The Taj Mahal was commissioned to be built by Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in 1632 for his third wife Mumtaz Mahal who had died during childbirth a year before. The white marble mausoleum was completed in 1648 while it took another five years for the surrounding gardens and structures to be completed.

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Iftar at Jama Masjid

Delhi summers are humid. Getting out of the cool air-conditioned metro and up the escalator, the humid weather decides you are its long lost friend. It engulfs you, leaves you drenched and yet, no matter how hot it is, just the thought of iftar (the evening meal at sunset when Muslims break their fast during Ramzan) keeps your legs moving forward one step at a time.

The last rays of the sun

The last rays of the sun

Old Delhi is crowded like it usually is. I hop, skip and jump where I can see a relatively empty stretch of the pavement. But then again I’m forced to step on to the road in front of the million rickshaws jostling for space. The narrow street leads to Jama Masjid. I cross shops selling invitation cards and bathroom taps at wholesale rates, sellers shouting out their wares, old men trying to pack up after a day’s hard work. A little boy almost crashed into me trying to run as fast his legs would carry him towards Jama Masjid, to make it in time for the prayer call.

Crowded street in front of Jama Masjid

Crowded street in front of Jama Masjid

It’s not easy to navigate the streets of Old Delhi but once you make it to the front of the Masjid, the incredible smells from every nearby shop leaves you gloriously hungry. A chef frying pieces of potatoes coated with semolina, a fruit seller chopping up melons, bananas and apples to keep plates ready in time, the dipping of the raw samosas into piping hot oil in a gigantic wok…

Heaps and heaps of sewai

Heaps and heaps of sewai

Iftar was scheduled at 7.25pm. As I waited in front of the Masjid, I saw families and friends buying dried fruits and bottled sherbets and the fried goods in bulk. Some had water bottles in their hands just in case they couldn’t manage to eat anything on time to break their fast.

Dried fruit sellers breaking their fast

Dried fruit sellers breaking their fast

The sun’s rays slowly gave way to dusk. The sky changed colours… from a pale blue, the minarets stood out against a fiery red, then burnt orange and finally, fairy lights lit up in the black darkness. It was time to eat.

As the prayer calls rang out, I saw many scramble up the stairs into the mosque. Most mosques serve free iftaar in the form of fruits and savouries. My friend and I made our way to the opposite alley from where the delicious smells tantilised me as I waited for her arrival. There was so much to choose from. We sat at Al-Jawahar, a really great eating joint for Mughlai food, and dug into the little fried goods and fruit platters. A nice refreshing rose flavoured sherbet with lime followed.

Few steps from the eatery we came across a shop selling Shahi Tukra, a mouthwatering sweet dish of bread dipped in syrup and dried fruits. We washed that down with cold almond milk as perspiration dripped down our backs.

Delicious hot fried goodness and fruits to break the fast

Delicious hot fried goodness and fruits to break the fast

“You have to eat the mutton samosa,” said Zubina excitedly. “They are just so good.” Unfortunately after a good half hour after iftaar began and wolfing down sweets like there was no tomorrow, the mutton samosas remained elusive. We have to leave something for the next time we go back after all!

Shahi tukda. Deliciously sweet

Shahi tukra. Deliciously sweet

Fairy lights light up Jama Masjid

Fairy lights light up Jama Masjid

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